VintageWarmer Presence

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I’ve been using the PSP VintageWarmer plug-in now for many years, and the secret about this great plug-in has been out for a while, which is good. For me, what VintageWarmer is good about are two things: making the digital domain sound more soft as with analog circuits, and to push the middle range up without making the mix too muddy.

Here’s a typical setup that I have in the master section of either Logic or Live. There are a couple of things good to know when using VintageWarmer.

First, the mix should be set to 50% or so, if you go all the way to 100%, it’s seldom I’ve been able to get a nice sound, it usually overwhelms the final mix.

Secondly, I keep the ceiling at 0, this is like a limiter, this will limit the outgoing signal. I seldom key the drive over 2 (unless I use it on individual tracks as a compressor). I set the knee between 20 and 50 in most cases.

As for the speed, this could be between 0 and 80 or so. I don’t use the multi-band settings in most cases.

By listening to the final master using on/off, I could hear the difference, and adjust it. In general, for mastering, it’s better to be more gentle with VintageWarmer, than push it too hard. Anyway, this is my secret trick to get the middle range up without making the whole mix too muddy, and as a bonus I could remove harshness of digital tracks.

3 Comments:

  1. cool thanks for the post. Do you use it on finished dj mixes or when playing live?

  2. This was actually a typical scenario for a production track that have and will be released. As for mix mastering, the best is to leave it alone as much as possible, even if sometimes a little bit VW might help for earlier weak tracks used in a mix.

    Some DJs use VintageWarmer on the master channel on Ableton Live, the setups might differ, but this is a good starting point. For a long time I didn’t use VW for DJ work, main reason was that there was no Universal binary available until recently.

  3. Thank you for this, it explains a lot. I really like your site and thank you for making this information available for free.

    Much respect for what you do,
    Ruiner the Producer
    http://www.djruiner.com/

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