Track Colorization

colorization.pngSomething that was already in Logic 7 (and most DAWs as I know of by now) is colorization of tracks. The handy keyboard shortcut in Logic is option-c. This will open up a palette of colors. If you have one or more regions selected, and choose a color, this will be assigned to each one.

Now, if you double-click on the actual palette elements, you get a color chooser, so you could further define what colors are present in the palette.

My main motivation to use this is that I like seeing big patterns, especially when the canvas area is crowded, or otherwise zoomed out. I usually specify certain colors for certain regions: blue for drum regions (can’t live without them), red for bass lines. Now when I think of it, I should use white for solos and melodies, so it’s red, white and blue!

Anyway, similarly, you could use certain base colors to define certain sub-groups of regions, and based on such color meta-info you could quickly get the big picture of the current track content.

One Comment:

  1. I use colorization in Ableton Live.

    I have no specific color for certain sounds (drums etc) but I tend to colorize pads in same(ish) colors, just in slighly different tint.

    The witty part of using colors comes when creating a change in pattern. A bassline, for instance, would be dark red when in intros & outros, playing the simple line, but when the track really kicks in, and the variation starts, then color of the clip is slightly lighter.

    Speeds up finding the right spot and creating different structures.

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