Taming Multiple Wild Bass Lines

Fire in the SkyI suspect every producer has their own pet idea, or production part, that they want to include, whether it works or not, but it’s just something that they want to have in there. In my case it’s multiple bass lines.

Oh, I know the voes of balancing those out, making sure they work together, having a cohesive track, and it would be much, much easier to just use one single bass line, one bass sound, and get the job done.

But no, something in my brain forces me to just sit another night up and tweaking and tweaking until I tamed the three or so wild bass line horses so they work together from beginning to end. Usually one starts, and there’s two at the end, I’m not so crazy to overlap them (unless I use a doubling track to get the bass lines sound better.)

Maybe one reason it happens for me is that I seldom hear production with multiple different bass sounds and lines, and it just sounds different. Or then, the Blue Monday virus is stuck in my mind forever. To make things interesting, in today’s techno-flavored dance music, the bass lines are somewhat abstract, FM-sounding, with no clear lines, so then it should not even be an issue if I’m working on such tracks.

Anyway, if you never tried to put in three or even four bass lines, check it out: it is an interesting problem, as someone from the East would say.

Leave a Reply