More Adventures With Melodyne and Guitar Loops

melodyne_guitar_loops.pngSo I’ve been recording short guitar riffs, 4 to 16 bar ones, tonight. The work-flow was to record a vanilla guitar signal, no effects, into a Logic track with a drum playing so I could keep track of the pace. Then I edited the guitar riff with Melodyne so it had a nice fit. After that I bounced it out as a 24-bit WAV file to the Bounced directory and made sure it also showed up in the Logic Bin. Now I could use this riff in Ableton Live, for example.

After this I imported back the guitar riff into another track in Logic and now exported it as an Apple Loop so I could use it as an Apple Loop in Logic projects.

The idea is to have a huge set of guitar riffs and simple guitar melodies and then put together song structures using these riffs. The clean guitar signal is then processed with PodFarm entries so I could make the simple guitar sound to nearly anything. It’s a little bit like having MIDI files and use different software synths with the same MIDI file.

It actually works really well. The quick test showed that I could make a 3 minute arena-rock like track by taking three of the guitar stems, use heavy-distortion PodFarm patches, pan two guitars left and right and have something useful within minutes.

So, basically, having a set of private guitar riff parts makes it possible to quickly make songs and as they are tight  and as AppleLoops useful in all kind of places. It does not hurt to play real guitar tracks now and then but for exploration and making new songs this is a very interesting workflow I recommend. If you have 100+ riffs you could do nearly anything.

2 Comments:

  1. Yes, working on a bigger set of music to be released as podcasts, streamed radio and possibly an album release, not sure yet.

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