DJ Tracks from DJs, for DJs

synth_at_the_swimming_pool.jpgGoing through dance tracks, it’s sometimes very obvious if a DJ has produced a track or not. In one sentence: they make tracks that are easy to mix together with other tracks.

Going through details about this. Such tracks have a long intro with just plain drums or material with no strong melodies, making it easy to mix it in. Similarly, at the end there’s a long section where it’s easy to mix it out.

The format is very 16 or 8 bar centric, the breaks start at such parts, are multiples of 8 or 16 bars. Same with any other known sections in the track. It’s seldom the tracks have an odd thing thrown in, causing problems mixing other tracks in, or even for someone dancing getting back to the pace.

The track has long sections of repetitions, makes it possible for the DJ to use filter sweeps or other effects to put in their own touch to the track.

The track as no sudden surprises, such as abrupt volume changes, tempo changes, empty spaces with nothing suddenly happening, and so on.

The track is also of decent length, not just barely three minutes, rather at least five minutes or more. It has a smaller breakdown in the beginning, and a bigger breakdown around four minutes or so. The breakdowns are not mandatory, but it’s just one of those standard patterns most tracks have today.

As a nice bonus, such tracks have here and there a nice repetitive pattern, such as a singer pattern, that could be used as a acappellas somewhere else.

Now, producers could indeed do anything they want with their tracks. With Ableton Live and other similar tools the DJ could put together a DJ-friendly track, as well. If you really want both, make two versions, one is your artistic representation, and one is a remix that is suitable for DJ purposes. Also, if you never DJ:ed, but are producing dance music, it’s worth trying it out so you learn all this in a real-life scenario.

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